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Guest Post by Barry

by Margaret Powling-

Hello, there!  Barry Powling here.  I’m the grand-dog (as opposed to grand-son).  My mummy and daddy have gone to Bath today on the train and I was told that I couldn’t go.  I’m not too sad about that because although I’ve only heard about trains, I don’t really know what they are but as I can’t chase them I’m not really interested.  Imagine having to sit on something you can’t chase.  How boring!

I am a Patterdale Terrier, originally a working dog bred in the Lakeland area of England.  I have no idea where that is, but I expect there are lots of lakes (obviously!) and perhaps plenty of rabbits to chase!  I was born in Barry in Wales, hence my name.  Sad to say, my name always causes some amusement.   The joke is wearing a bit thin now.   “Ho Ho, Barry, what a funny name for a dog!” People say when I’m being introduced.   How would they like it if I laughed at their names? 

Granny looked up Patterdale Terriers in her book The Observer’s Book of Dogs. This was a present on her 10th birthday from her Granddad, so she treasures it.  She says, “The photo in the book looks nothing like Barry!”  Maybe we Patterdales have changed a bit since this book was published 72 years ago?  The photo looks more like a little Fox Terrier, with its wiry coat.  My coat is smooth and shines like glossy paint.    

Indeed, Granny has been Googling Patterdale Terriers and has found out that we are a “type” of dog rather than a “breed”.  Type? I don’t much care for the sound of that!  But Granny says we are a culmination – whatever that means – of working terrier breeds indigenous to the United Kingdom.  “Indigenous”?  Doesn’t she mean simply “Genius”?

I enjoy being with Granny and Granddad as they talk to me!  Well, Granny does.  Granny uses the same tone of voice when talking to me as she does to anyone who is male, whether it’s Granddad, her two sons, her little grandson, or me.  So sometimes Granddad can’t tell whether she’s addressing him or me!  She says that all males are much the same regardless of age or breed.  They just need simple, clear instructions and rewards for good behaviour!

Of course, when I’m here, I am very well-behaved. Well, unless a cat has the temerity to stroll through the garden. I can’t abide cats, pesky things.  I can’t understand why Granny likes cats, she even talks to them!  Imagine a grown woman of reasonable intellect bending down and saying “Hello pussy cat, what a dear little cat you are!”  I heard that once she had a couple of them living here!  Ugh!

My purpose in life is to guard people or property.   I wasn’t trained to do this, it’s a natural instinct that we dogs have, handed down through generations of dogs.  But barking – which is compulsory – can be exhausting, and after a barking session which Granny and Granddad don’t seem to appreciate, I need a lie down to recover.

I love it when I help Granny in the kitchen. Today she’s been making fish pies.  I can’t say that’s my favourite meal as there’s no meat in it, but she sometimes gives me a little piece of cheese when she’s been grating it for the sauce.

Later on …

I’m up and about again.  I’ve had forty winks, but that is all I need and I’m up and raring to go again.  I had a good barking session, too, because some men arrived to bring Granny’s new tumble dryer.  I have absolutely no idea that that is, but she was angry and said if I wasn’t a good boy and stopped barking she would put me in it and switch it on!  And then she said she was sorry, she didn’t mean it, and she was going to toast some hot cross buns!   And after I put my head to one side in an attempt to look appealing, she gave me a tiny piece.

I’m tired again now. I’m no longer a teenage dog and I need to rest more often, a bit like Granny and Granddad.   And Granny’s chair in the study is so comfy.  I am now going into the sitting room with Granny and she’s said if I’m good I can sit with her on the sofa and watch a film on Netflix, providing, she says, she can find something suitable.  I hope it will be 101 Dalmations, that’s my favourite film!

I have enjoyed chatting to you all,

Happy Easter everyone,

Barry

 

 

Margaret Powling

19 Comments

  1. Bess

    Happy Easter, Barry!

    13 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      Woof! Woof!

      13 . Apr . 2017
  2. Sue

    What a lovely boy he is, I have a friend who had a PatternJack, half Patterndale and half Jack Russell.

    13 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      He is a great little fellow, Sue. I’d not heard of PatterJack, but he is very much like a Jack Russell (and just as mad!) He can’t be allowed off the lead, he’d just escape down a rabbit hole! Sometimes, but only seldom, when his mummy and daddy find a place away from traffic they have what they call a ‘biscuit run’ so that each of them has some dog biscuits and he runs between the two of them, enticed by the biscuits, otherwise he’d run off somewhere. This way he gets proper exercise.

      13 . Apr . 2017
  3. Eloise

    How delightful to make your acquaintance, Barry. Yes, you do have an unusual name for a dog but surely that is preferable to being a run-of-the-mill Rover or Fido. (i once knew someone with dogs called Keith and Brenda. I just say this to make you feel a little less self conscious. I’m not sure there is anything else to say about dogs called Keith and Brenda). From what I have come to know of your granny, she has a penchant for beautifully co-ordinated decor which, I presume, is why you so cleverly match the rug beside you. The question is – was the rug purchased to complement yourself, or would you, in fact, be a less welcome guest were you an Irish Setter (for example) ?

    13 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      Thank you, Eloise. I may call you Eloise, mayn’t I? I quite like my name, as you say it’s different! Oh, those are funny names for dogs, Keith and Brenda. Granny says that if she remembers correctly, these were the monikers that Private Eye gave to HM The Queen and Prince Philip! And Princess Margaret was called Yvonne! As for the rug, no, Granny didn’t buy it specially. It’s just a very old one she has and it makes the chair cosier for me. I’m still waiting for mummy and daddy to collect me. They shouldn’t be too long now. I hope they enjoyed Bath (mummy said that it was a Bath that didn’t nee any soap! I don’t understand that!) Granddad took me into the garden so that I could do what a dog has to do, and Granny gave me my tea. Indeed, I’ve had a very nice day! Night, night!

      13 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      I would like to add that I think I misunderstood regarding the rug. The rug on the chair in the study is an old one. The rug on the floor in the sitting room is one we’ve had for about 15 years and was purchased when we redecorated the room in 2002, but it does rather ‘go’ with Barry, doesn’t it?

      13 . Apr . 2017
  4. Eloise

    Do you know what, I had no idea about the Queen and Prince Philip. I always did wonder why their owner chose those names! Talking of names, I’ll let you into a secret…Eloise is not my first name but when I first responded to a blog I found that there was another responder with my name and so, to avoid confusion, I decided not to use it (not least because I didn’t agree with what she was saying). I have also been looking after my grandchildren today (the human variety). It’s a nice way to spend time, but rather exhausting so I am off to bed in a moment. Sweet dreams.

    13 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      Eloise is a lovely name, so it’s good that you are using it! Barry has just been collected and we are now off to bed, too. He was very good, I have to say. I think he amused himself using the computer today – he’s such a clever little dog!

      13 . Apr . 2017
  5. Elaine

    Two beautiful Patterdale puppies have just come to live in our village, Barry. They are almost as handsome as you. Their names also make people smile – ‘George’ and ‘Mildred’. Their new home is just across the barley field, so Toby often meets them and hands out a little advice on ‘how to get the most out of your owners’.
    Delighted to have made your acquaintance. Have a lovely Easter!

    14 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      Oh, I’d love to meet those two new neigbouring dogs! We could exchange notes on ‘how to get the most out of your owners’! Love, Barry xx

      14 . Apr . 2017
  6. Marlene Stevens

    Lovely to meet you Barry, hope to see you again soon.

    14 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      Yes, I’ve no doubt I will put in an appearance again one of these days! Love, Barry xx

      14 . Apr . 2017
  7. Lara

    Barry, so nice to meet you. I’m very impressed with your grammar and spelling. You are obviously an intelligent dog. And from the way you have described your day with your grandparents, also extremely well behaved. I think you should be applauded on having your humans so well trained. Do you know that some dogs are left alone with little more than a toy or a bone when their humans go out ? I know, shocking, isn’t it. I’m glad that you are left with two devoted humans who hand feed you snacks and rearrange the furnishings for your comfort – no less than what you deserve.

    I hope you don’t think less of me but I have a cat. You’ll note I didn’t say I ‘own’ a cat, because as you no doubt know, all of you delightful four-legged companions do us the honour of owning us 🙂 She is kept indoors most of the time and would not have the temerity of walking through your property. As much as I currently share my quarters with said cat, I can confidently assure you that I adore dogs. Short ones. Tall ones. Hairy ones. Smooth ones. And of course, handsome ones such as yourself.

    Thank you for sharing your time with us. One question before I go – do you touch type or do you dictate to Grandma ?

    14 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      And so lovely to make your acquaintance, Lara! You are obviously a person of discerning taste regarding dogs, not sure about the moggies (that is what we call cats here in the UK, you might have another name for them Down Under!) Yes, I’ve heard that some poor dogs are left all day on their own. Maybe they have a dog-flap so that they can excuse themselves in the garden? I’d not be able to go a whole day without a widdle! As for typing, it’s a skill I learned through watching Granny, who types as fast as she speaks! I’ve not quite up to that speed yet, but I keep trying!

      14 . Apr . 2017
  8. ratnamurti

    woofhello Barry. Or, in my case: yap, yap, yap! I am a wee black pomeranian-papillion who has been staying with her own granny! And is granny’s favourite grandchild. (some of the people grandchildren don’t realise that…..) You sound really smart and look very handsome. I’m sure that I would not be scared of you.

    Your friend, Pixie (so called because granny says I’m 1/2 fairy, 1/2 dog…which is quite sweet really)

    15 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      Woof, Woof, Pixie! Happy to make your acquaintance! Oh, I’m not at all scary to other dogs, just cats! And we can’t help our voices, can we? Let’s face it, we’d not expect a German Shepherd to yap or a wee doggy such as yourself to bark? Thank you so much for getting in touch, barks and sniffs and licks from Barry xx

      15 . Apr . 2017
  9. Joy

    I think ‘Barry’ is a wonderful name, and I like his point of view of life.

    15 . Apr . 2017
    • Margaret Powling

      Barry has been here again today while his mummy and daddy went out for a family meal. He has been very good and sat with us and watched television as it’s been a chilly day, too chilly for us to do any gardening. We will see him on Monday when we are all having a family meal. Happy Easter to you, Joy. I hope you will look in again.

      15 . Apr . 2017

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